Category Archives for SEO Talk and Tea

The Power of People Also Ask Boxes in Google Searches

Transcript

Hi guys. And welcome to another edition of the Zupo SEO Talk & Tea. 

Today's conversation is about setting the record straight about video optimizing SEO. Video is a very important sector of marketing that is exponentially growing and therefore has become integral to a lot of people's marketing strategy. This is a video in itself. And so a lot of video as being discussed about why it's important and a lot of that bleeds into SEO. And so they're... A video and SEO are great tools for each other, but there are a lot of misconceptions that I do want to clear up on today's video. But today I want to introduce the tea we have first. Today we have the Magic Dragon tea. This is one of those teas that one of my housemates gifted to the household. And so this is from DAVIDsTEA. The Magic Dragon is very sweet. Let me read you the ingredients. Apple, rose hip, hibiscus, sweet blackberry leaves, dragon fruit, corn flour, [inaudible 00:00:53] pedals, and natural dragon fruit flavoring. And I don't know what natural dragon fruit flavor means, but it's a very sweet tea.

So let's go ahead and get brewing, get talking. So setting the record straight about video and SEO. One of the things about video and SEO, and this is important, is that video is the future. A lot of companies are investing heavily. More and more people are getting into video. Things like YouTube, TikTok are really... And smartphones are really allowing this accessibility into videos. And so there's a lot of literature out there about why videos are so good for SEO. But something that I want to really clarify is I've been through enough sales meetings and just meetings with people who have read on the internet that video is great for SEO. But there's some things I want to clarify. A lot of the benefits when it comes to video SEO, are not always as [inaudible 00:01:48] as people think they are. I like to think that they're a little bit more correlated.

So let me just talk about that then. So, I think the thought is... And this did not steep very long. So I think I'm going to pour that back in. A lot of people, I think they have this idea that, "Oh, this is a video on my site, Google likes that. So automatic raking bump." That is definitely not the case. And so there's things that I want to kind of clarify. Because I have dealt with videos before. I have dealt with companies who have predominantly too many videos on their site. Okay. Maybe not too many, but they have a lot. And there have been some consequences that they were unforeseen that appeared once we got onto the SEO account.

And so the first thing is I think the two stats I hear the most is... One is not even data backed. When people just say Google likes videos, so they're going to rank it higher, no, that's not the case. Two, is that video increases conversion rates and people's time on page, therefore helping their SEO. That's the true one. Video is much more interactive. When people see a video, they'll stay on your website longer and they will probably interact more. Hopefully they're clicking around and maybe they'll convert better. But something that I want to note is that time on page and if people are clicking around is a ranking factor, but not in the sense that people think. The main issue that comes to time on page is if someone's clicking on your site, on the Google search result, and clicking out within less than three seconds, two seconds, Google sees that as a ding that they probably were very happy there. Now, if they go onto your website and they like the video and they stay for a very long time, that does help.

But that is a very micro situation where you're already on the first page. And you're kind of battling for the first spot. If you are a website that does not rank on the first page and like you're on the fifth page of the Google and you have a video on your webpage, it's not like that video is going to take you to the first spot. Because your idea that, "Oh, well people are going to stay out here longer." Well, who's navigating to that page if you're on the fifth page of Google? So my thought process is when you're using video, it is more for a... if it close... If we're thinking about video and websites like ales process, it is the closer, not the inbound lead generation. So what I mean by that is your SEO needs to be good independent of the video because your SEO has to be so good that you can get on the first page. And the video will be an add on, where once you rank on the first page, people come to the site and they can convert.

But video is not to be confused as, "Oh, a video will be a part of me getting to the first page." That could be the case. Like you can have a video and that's fun. But what I want to make sure you understand is that it's not the video itself. It's the entire gamut of the experience or the whole totality of the experience. And what I have often found is people over hedge the video. They say, "Oh, I have a video. It looks great. We spent money and time on it. So therefore, we'll put the video on the site and we'll be good to go." At the end of the day, when you add a video on the site, it's just an embed. It's just an embed code from YouTube or Vimeo. You're just taking your code, putting it on your site. And it pops up.

I would say most people would need to put way more time on the actual webpage that they're trying to rank for and the site than the video. The video is whatever. You can use whatever video and put on there, that's fine. But really the text around the video is what matters the most. So let me give you another example, just kind of drive this home. I have a client who they... The site was predominantly a portfolio of videos and they had been in business for many years and the videos were amazing. These guys have some of the best videos you'll see, right? But they were not ranking well. And so when I got in there, I was tasked to help him with the SEO. And I told him, I said, "You have a site beautifully designed with videos, but you literally have zero actual text content."

So the entire SEO project was building out the video portfolios into an actually text oriented website. And just like that, they ranked on the first page of Google. It was not the videos themselves, it was the text content. For SEO, it is still very text content based and you need to optimize the amount of text content. It is not to say, videos are bad. You should still have videos. But don't think the videos will be your SEO strategy. Use that strategy for YouTube. Videos are YouTube strategy. SEO is a text based strategy. So therefore I want to clear up some misconceptions. If someone's trying to sell you a video and they say, it's going to help you with your SEO. Yes. I don't know. I guess. That's like someone telling you a car is a great investment. Like yes, a car drives you from point A to point B, but I don't know how much it is of a good investment in terms of making me money back for you.

So I digress. I think this is a whole philosophy of thought kind of thing. But as an SEO who worked in this every day, I've never bought a video for SEO purposes. A video is better for conversion purposes, which is more correlated. So it's not necessarily a lie, but you have to mind how much you're going to believe that. I have been in too many sales meetings where I have to smile through someone saying, "And you know Jason, videos really help your SEO and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah." Yes. But it's such a marginal improvement that that's not what really should be talked about. If you're trying to sell me on the value of whatever your service or product is for the SEO. There's many other things that are more impactful.

So hopefully I didn't talk your ear too much off. Yeah, I didn't go that long. And so hopefully you guys found that very valuable and you liked it. Hopefully that'll help you in the sales process if you're having to hear someone or you're evaluating different strategies. But I'm going to go ahead and pour out my tea. It does look better now. I just like to steep it a little bit longer. And hope to see you guys again soon. Thanks everybody.

Oh, sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet.

Setting the Record Straight about Video Optimizing SEO

Transcript

Hi guys. And welcome to another edition of the Zupo SEO Talk & Tea.

Today's conversation is about setting the record straight about video optimizing SEO. Video is a very important sector of marketing that is exponentially growing and therefore has become integral to a lot of people's marketing strategy. This is a video in itself. And so a lot of video as being discussed about why it's important and a lot of that bleeds into SEO. And so they're... A video and SEO are great tools for each other, but there are a lot of misconceptions that I do want to clear up on today's video. But today I want to introduce the tea we have first. Today we have the Magic Dragon tea. This is one of those teas that one of my housemates gifted to the household. And so this is from DAVIDsTEA. The Magic Dragon is very sweet. Let me read you the ingredients. Apple, rose hip, hibiscus, sweet blackberry leaves, dragon fruit, corn flour, [inaudible 00:00:53] pedals, and natural dragon fruit flavoring. And I don't know what natural dragon fruit flavor means, but it's a very sweet tea.

So let's go ahead and get brewing, get talking. So setting the record straight about video and SEO. One of the things about video and SEO, and this is important, is that video is the future. A lot of companies are investing heavily. More and more people are getting into video. Things like YouTube, TikTok are really... And smartphones are really allowing this accessibility into videos. And so there's a lot of literature out there about why videos are so good for SEO. But something that I want to really clarify is I've been through enough sales meetings and just meetings with people who have read on the internet that video is great for SEO. But there's some things I want to clarify. A lot of the benefits when it comes to video SEO, are not always as [inaudible 00:01:48] as people think they are. I like to think that they're a little bit more correlated.

So let me just talk about that then. So, I think the thought is... And this did not steep very long. So I think I'm going to pour that back in. A lot of people, I think they have this idea that, "Oh, this is a video on my site, Google likes that. So automatic raking bump." That is definitely not the case. And so there's things that I want to kind of clarify. Because I have dealt with videos before. I have dealt with companies who have predominantly too many videos on their site. Okay. Maybe not too many, but they have a lot. And there have been some consequences that they were unforeseen that appeared once we got onto the SEO account.

And so the first thing is I think the two stats I hear the most is... One is not even data backed. When people just say Google likes videos, so they're going to rank it higher, no, that's not the case. Two, is that video increases conversion rates and people's time on page, therefore helping their SEO. That's the true one. Video is much more interactive. When people see a video, they'll stay on your website longer and they will probably interact more. Hopefully they're clicking around and maybe they'll convert better. But something that I want to note is that time on page and if people are clicking around is a ranking factor, but not in the sense that people think. The main issue that comes to time on page is if someone's clicking on your site, on the Google search result, and clicking out within less than three seconds, two seconds, Google sees that as a ding that they probably were very happy there. Now, if they go onto your website and they like the video and they stay for a very long time, that does help.

But that is a very micro situation where you're already on the first page. And you're kind of battling for the first spot. If you are a website that does not rank on the first page and like you're on the fifth page of the Google and you have a video on your webpage, it's not like that video is going to take you to the first spot. Because your idea that, "Oh, well people are going to stay out here longer." Well, who's navigating to that page if you're on the fifth page of Google? So my thought process is when you're using video, it is more for a... if it close... If we're thinking about video and websites like ales process, it is the closer, not the inbound lead generation. So what I mean by that is your SEO needs to be good independent of the video because your SEO has to be so good that you can get on the first page. And the video will be an add on, where once you rank on the first page, people come to the site and they can convert.

But video is not to be confused as, "Oh, a video will be a part of me getting to the first page." That could be the case. Like you can have a video and that's fun. But what I want to make sure you understand is that it's not the video itself. It's the entire gamut of the experience or the whole totality of the experience. And what I have often found is people over hedge the video. They say, "Oh, I have a video. It looks great. We spent money and time on it. So therefore, we'll put the video on the site and we'll be good to go." At the end of the day, when you add a video on the site, it's just an embed. It's just an embed code from YouTube or Vimeo. You're just taking your code, putting it on your site. And it pops up.

I would say most people would need to put way more time on the actual webpage that they're trying to rank for and the site than the video. The video is whatever. You can use whatever video and put on there, that's fine. But really the text around the video is what matters the most. So let me give you another example, just kind of drive this home. I have a client who they... The site was predominantly a portfolio of videos and they had been in business for many years and the videos were amazing. These guys have some of the best videos you'll see, right? But they were not ranking well. And so when I got in there, I was tasked to help him with the SEO. And I told him, I said, "You have a site beautifully designed with videos, but you literally have zero actual text content."

So the entire SEO project was building out the video portfolios into an actually text oriented website. And just like that, they ranked on the first page of Google. It was not the videos themselves, it was the text content. For SEO, it is still very text content based and you need to optimize the amount of text content. It is not to say, videos are bad. You should still have videos. But don't think the videos will be your SEO strategy. Use that strategy for YouTube. Videos are YouTube strategy. SEO is a text based strategy. So therefore I want to clear up some misconceptions. If someone's trying to sell you a video and they say, it's going to help you with your SEO. Yes. I don't know. I guess. That's like someone telling you a car is a great investment. Like yes, a car drives you from point A to point B, but I don't know how much it is of a good investment in terms of making me money back for you.

So I digress. I think this is a whole philosophy of thought kind of thing. But as an SEO who worked in this every day, I've never bought a video for SEO purposes. A video is better for conversion purposes, which is more correlated. So it's not necessarily a lie, but you have to mind how much you're going to believe that. I have been in too many sales meetings where I have to smile through someone saying, "And you know Jason, videos really help your SEO and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah." Yes. But it's such a marginal improvement that that's not what really should be talked about. If you're trying to sell me on the value of whatever your service or product is for the SEO. There's many other things that are more impactful.

So hopefully I didn't talk your ear too much off. Yeah, I didn't go that long. And so hopefully you guys found that very valuable and you liked it. Hopefully that'll help you in the sales process if you're having to hear someone or you're evaluating different strategies. But I'm going to go ahead and pour out my tea. It does look better now. I just like to steep it a little bit longer. And hope to see you guys again soon. Thanks everybody. Oh, sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet.

Check and Monitor the Stability of Rankings Before Engaging

Transcript

Hi guys. And welcome to another edition of Zupo SEO Talk & Tea. 

Today's conversation is checking the stability of rankings before you designate need a keyword target. That's a very long jargony title, and I'll get more into the details of it soon, just to kind of understand what we're talking about, is when you're picking keywords that you want to rank for, there are some checks that I would actually recommend to help you identify those targets.

But before we begin, I want to introduce the tea we have today. This is not the actual box that it comes in, but I just leave it in this tea. It's a Pu'Er cake that I tend to drink every so often. I've had Pu'Er a lot on this channel, but this is a little different. You can see by the tea, it's kind of caked up like it's really smashed together, so that's kind of how you can see it right now. So this is a tea that was gifted to me to... One of my uncles is a big tea guy, and so he has kind of helped awaken my love for tea as well.

But let's go ahead in talking about this topic. So the reason why this is so important is that when you're trying to rank for keywords in Google, oftentimes what most people do is they'll Google a keyword, they'll look at the search results, see who's ranked on the first page, and then they'll probably look at where they're ranked, and then they'll make their entire strategy based on that. The issue is that Google is famous for updating their search results every day, every hour, and so on and so forth. Therefore, measuring all of your research and data on one point in time that you did the Google search can be faulty because you may have Googled the keyword at a time where they were doing some testing or changing the search results, and so all your data and speculation might be false.

So the reason why this is so important that when you're choosing keywords, you also want to measure the stability of those keyword rankings for that keyword. So what I mean by that is, I had a client who were looking at different keywords to rank for. And one of them that popped up was this keyword that we were interested in, we looked in the first page, and we saw like, okay, there's a slot on there where a competitor of ours is ranking on the first page and we think we can beat them out. So let's go ahead and start looking into it. But before we went in there, I said, let me do a quick check first, and so I went into my SEO tools and I use [HRS, 00:02:12] but I believe a lot of SEO tools can do this. I said, let me look at that keyword first.

And actually when we looked at that keyword, in the last six months the top five position had all been very volatile, especially that competitor that we were looking at. They were ranked on the first five within the last month, but in the months before that they were not. They were coming in and out every other month. So that shows us that keyword Google was still testing to figure out what is the best results to have. So even though we see our competitor there right now, Google is still having them jump in and out. That might be an indicator that Google was not sure about what to do with the search results, therefore, that slot that we think is available may not be available in the future as they keep testing.

So sometimes it is worth, when you're looking into keywords, to identify how stable the search results were over a period of time. Because if they are stable, then you can feel a little bit more confident that, okay, it's stable, Google knows what they want to show here, so let's try to rank on the first page for this. But if it's very volatile and it's changing all the time, you could try all the best you can do to try to rank on there, but if Google said, "You know what? We don't really like sites like yours anymore. This is more of an informational Google search assault rather than commercial," then no matter what you do, you're not ranking on the first page. So therefore you want to check the stability of the rankings over time to give you a realistic idea of if you have a chance to be able to rank for it.

So hopefully that will help you when you're trying to identify keyword targets for your SEO and your site. You really want to monitor if you can check the stability of the rankings. And to do so, you can use a bunch of SEO tools to do so but hopefully that was valuable for you guys. Hopefully that will help in your day to day. If you guys found the valuable, please like and subscribe. And I'll pour out my team now, and I hope to see everybody again soon. Thanks.

Ooh, that's hot.

Geographic Boundaries are Dictated by Google, Not Your SEO

Transcript

Hi guys, and welcome to another edition of Zupo's SEO Talk & Tea. 

Today's conversation is about geographic boundaries and SEO, and who dictates them. And short answer, it's Google, not us. But before we dive in, explaining what I mean by that, I want to introduce the tea we have today. Today we have a jasmine green tea, and the reason why we're having this tea today is, one, I like it, but two, it is a relatively hot day. I don't know if you can tell by just the lighting of the day, it is really sunny and hot, and it's really early in the morning. I normally film these very early in the morning so I can get away from the sun, but I don't know how the sun is so high in the sky. I guess today is going to be a really hot day. That's why you don't see me with my pad and green jacket. It's just way too hot for it. So hopefully you guys like the white T-shirt.

But let's go ahead, jump in, and talk about the conversation we have today. So when it comes to digital marketing, I think the world has benefited from a lot of sophistication and options. The days of TV or radio advertising, where you got to spend big bucks to get national coverage or statewide coverage, it's not really there anymore. Marketing is now more micro-targeting. Instagram influencers, Facebook ads, Google ads, and, of course, SEO is kind of one of those pockets. But there's something that kind of came up in my meetings the other day, and I wanted to film a video about this topic.

I had a client say to us, we were working on this campaign for a very long time where we were trying to get them ranked for two keyword groups that they were selling this product across the nation. And they were one of the distributors of the product and so they want to rank for it. And we spent months on it. And we ended up right at the cusp on the first page. So generally, where we were at was some days we were the eighth spot on the first page, and then some days we were the 11th spot, so on the second page.

So we were right on the cusp, and we were on that final push to get us on there. And the client had told me, "Actually, there's been an update on our contract. We can actually only sell these products in the southwestern part of the United States." And so they said, "Is there any way, with all this SEO work we've been doing, geotargeting it only to the area that we can actually sell. It doesn't matter to us if we rank on the first page in Florida because we can't sell there." And that's a great point. And the contract is updating with that product provider.

Now, the problem is SEO is something that is not as Swiss Army Knife as Google PPC, Google Ads, or Facebook ads, and so on and so forth. There is local SEO, but there isn't a method to be like, "Okay, I want to rank for..." Let me use the pizza example. "I want to rank for pizza." Let's say pizza recipes. Let me use a more easy example. Let's say you want to rank for pizza recipes, which is a informational search, that if you look on it, recipes will come up. And I haven't done the search myself, but I believe it's a national search. The results will generally be the same across the country, no matter where you're searching. You, as a website, cannot optimize your pizza recipe keyword groups to say, "I want to rank for the national keyword, but only appear in the California or Orange County searches."

That doesn't really work. There's no way to tell them that. The only way to do that is to say pizza recipes in Orange County. Now the limitation of that, though, is, the limitation of SEO is always if people will search for it. So with that client, I said we can go look into that product, and say product in OC, or product in California, or product in Southern California. The problem is we needed to discover if anyone's even searching for that. Because if not, we could optimize for it, but what's the point if no one searches for it. So when it comes to geographic targeting... Wow, did I never brew the tea? I'm sorry, I'm going to talk and brew the tea. I got so into the topic that I never even got brewing. Why didn't you guys remind me, guys? That's your job, to remind me. Wow.

Anyways, where I was going with this is that, of course, again, you cannot just dictate to Google, like, "Oh, these are my geographic limitations." That's more for the PPC, social media, where you can say, "Okay, I only want to appear in these zip codes." The way that you can figure out where you can rank on Google is just really one of two ways. One is just how Google treats it. If you take a Google search and you test it and it's national, that it doesn't matter where you are in the States, it'll be generally the same results, it's a national kind of search query. If it's a local SEO play, where you can say like, okay, if I type this query in, it will return the local city or the local county back. On those, it will just depend on how Google treats it.

So if I type in pizza right now, you will most likely get search results that appear in your local city. There's no way to dictate. If someone types in pizza, I want it to show, even if I'm in a different county. You can't really play by that rules. You play by the rules that Google has set. So therefore, the only ways around dealing with geographic limitations is that if you have, like I just said, localities or geographic limitations, the first route is to go look into Google searches, see how they're treating the searches. If they're treating the searches out of a wider scale than you can deal with because your business is a local business, you can then try a second option, which is to add the locality or the geographic area.

Now, when you test those, they probably will show local results. And that's great, but you have to cross-reference with average monthly searches. There needs to be an average monthly searches to make it worth it. If not, then that keyword may not... You have to make a decision. Even though we don't really service the far realms beyond our locality, do we still want to rank for it? Or second, do we want to go in the local realm, even if there's no searches. Or you know what? This keyword just doesn't fit very well for our bottom line, so we'll pivot to another keyword group. That's also a common example.

Other ways around it is if the SEO side of things isn't playing nice, in the sense that you can't get the geographics to figure themselves out, that's when you can use Google ads, social media ads, LinkedIn, and Instagram to kind of offset it with that geographic kind of play.

So this is just another reminder then, guys, I filmed a video at the very beginning of the series, is that SEO and the other marketing tools, they have very differing circumstances in context, and there are some shortfalls of each one and they can cover each other. This was an example of where SEO is not as customizable, and you can use other marketing tactics to cover that up as well.

So hopefully you guys found that valuable. I'm going to pour the tea out. I'm going to remember that because I've told you not to pour this in earlier. If you guys found the video valuable, please like and subscribe, and I hope to see you guys again soon. Thanks everybody.

What is Image SEO and is it Worth It

Transcript

Hi guys, and welcome to another edition of Zupo's SEO Talk & Tea. 

Today's conversation is what is Image SEO, and is it worth it? I think this is an important conversation because Image SEO is been talked a lot of in the last five years. I've seen countless podcasts, and videos, and blog posts about it, so I want to go into that conversation today. But before we begin, I want to introduce the tea, because this is Zupo's SEO Talk & Tea. Today, we have a very special guest, if not my most favorite tea brand, Mei Leaf. We have a Baked Goods Oolong from Mei Leaf, and it is a Oolong tea that they wrote has cherry syrup drizzled butter flapjacks, vanilla, antique wood, and mangosteen kind of flavors. Once my girlfriend heard that she bought it at the drop of a hat.

I've it had a couple of times, haven't come to really understand it just yet. I sort of enjoy it. I feel like what I've really enjoyed this tea is when I've had it with a saltier breakfast. I think the sweetness of it really comes out because when my girlfriend and I were having this by itself, we couldn't really get the sweetness of it, but then it's funny that they put flapjacks and cherry syrup, because once we had a salty breakfast one day, and we drank this, we could taste the sweetness. So it was a great experience once we had it with the saltier breakfast.

But let's go ahead and get brewing and talking about Image SEO. So, Image SEO is the idea that you're going to link-build and do all these SEO tactics when trying to rank your images. So, images are a great way to link-build because of the rules on the internet. If you're going to use an image, you need to source the image. So you can provide images to people on different websites, and then they're going to have to source that image. Source essentially means they have to provide the exact URL where they found the image. So in the sense, Image SEO is trying to optimize your images to acquire links and then twofold it's to start ranking for Google Images. Now, this is an interesting concept because a lot of people understand Google Images, but I don't think a lot of people have thought about trying to rank for Google Images.

So the conversation I'm having today is Image SEO worth it? I have dabbled in it in the sense that I have used images in a sense to acquire links occasionally here and there, especially when we're providing a different website our own images. Now, my thoughts on this are Image SEO is a very interesting and innovative style of link-building, but I would question its importance for most businesses' bottom line. In my own experience using Google Images, I have never truly done a commercial or transactional query or experience on Google Images. Most of the time when I'm on Google Images, I'm just trying to find a picture of something you would copy and paste for a Google slides presentation, or just to reference something. I don't think I've truly ever really gone into an image, clicked it, opened the website and engaged with it. So in that sense, I would question the importance of Image SEO for most companies. And even if you're saying maybe for a link-building purposes, if you find a way to link-build on a mass scale images, then yes, go ahead and do so.

But my only concern with that too, is that if let's say you did acquire links to images, images on your site don't pay. There's no ability to really add internal links to an image because it would just be an image on the page. And therefore there's no way to pass that link equity to a section of the site that you want to. So my 2 cents is I don't think Image SEO truly is worth it. It's been talked about heavily, but I don't think it caught on. I don't think user engagements and users with Google really use images in the way that people wanted them to. And when I say people, I mean businesses wanting them to look at an image and buy something. I just don't think it has happened like that. And so I don't really think Image SEO is worth it.

Now, I'm not going to say don't ever consider it. It's stupid. Some businesses it might make sense, especially if you can find the link-building method through it. But more often than not, I just don't think it is something that you'll really need for your SEO. But for those of you who are Image SEO fans, and you really can speak to its effectiveness, please prove me wrong, or not prove me wrong. It's a little adversarial. Please enlighten me or add your perspective just so I can see a little bit of maybe why it'd be worth it, because I've been working in this industry for a very long time and I still have yet to find a strong reason why. So I'm encouraging people who are watching this, if you do have differing opinions, please leave in the comments. And so that way we can have a healthy discussion about opening perspectives of why it might actually work.

But let's go ahead and enjoy my Baked Goods Tea. I don't have a salty breakfast it's time to enjoy it with, but hate to use tea I don't want to drink it, right? I forgot to start off guys. I want to drink it so fast I forgot to sign off. If you guys found this video enjoyable, please like and subscribe, and I hope to see you guys again soon.

Thanks, everybody.

Tips for Using your YouTube Videos when Linkbuilding

Transcript

Hi guys and welcome to another edition of Zupo's SEO Talk & Tea. 

Thank you for joining me today. The sun is coming out, it's beautiful. I'm starting to sweat now because it's so hot, but let's go ahead and start talking SEO.

Today's conversation is going to be about how to use YouTube videos and Vimeo videos alongside your link building. I think that YouTube and video marketing is becoming a more and more important conversation when it comes to marketing, but also we have to understand how it fits together with SEO.

But before we begin, I want to introduce the tea we have today. We have a [inaudible 00:00:32] black tea from Tea station, which is an OG boba shop that I used to go to back in the day. I bought this tea, I think, six years ago, so it's been a long time. But let's go ahead and get brewing and get talking about this stuff.

So, the reason why I want to have this conversation is a lot of the clients and team that I work with, they're engaging in video marketing and they're doing a heck of a job doing so, right? So, in the sense that a lot of people are investing in YouTube and these videos are great, because they increase user engagement on your site, they help get exposure and they help people fall in love with your brand. But something that I've noticed is that there is a disconnect when it comes to video marketing and SEO.

One of the main things is that ... okay, I'm going to give you an example. Let's say you have a pizza shop, and in this pizza shop, I have videos about the five best pizzas that I think we make for a summer day, right? I'm not really a pizza cook, but let's just say that there's that article. I create this beautiful video where I show the five pizza, how's they're made, the summer and everything like that. It's great, we have this great video.

I upload it on YouTube like most people would, and then I start going out there trying to link build. I say, "Hey, we have this great piece for people who are looking to do ... what to do this summer. We have five of the best pizzas that they can have this summer in this local area." I'm in Orange County, so let's say the local Orange County area. So, I start putting that out there.

Let's say I start putting that out there and people are linking to it. They're linking to the video, right? They're going to be linking to the video you made, but it's hosted on YouTube. So that means that YouTube is going to get your hyperlink and the link equity from your link building efforts. The problem is social medias, and YouTube is considered a social media, all links coming out of social medias are no followed. Meaning that the links that are coming out of there, they're recognized by Google, but they don't pass any link equity.

What that means then is that if you're sending links to YouTube, one, you're sending link equity to a different website that's not your own, and the second, you can't pass link equity back to your website, because all the things coming out of that site are no followed. What does this all mean? You need to be more strategic with your link building when it comes to videos. I'm not saying don't make videos, but when you make videos and you're trying to go out there and go exposure, it is worth it sometimes to link to your own website.

So what I recommend a lot to my clients, take your YouTube video, put it on your site, embed it in there, make it look pretty, have a title, have the transcripts down there. If you can, try to make it look prettier with images and just make the experience of the page better than the one on YouTube. Therefore, when people are linking to it, they want to link to your page. They will then link to your website and the page, therefore you get actual link equity, rather than passing the link equity to YouTube.

Because though YouTube and video marketing is great, I love YouTube, I spend all my time on there. If we're thinking about SEO and straight link building purposes, we don't want to be sending link equity out, because you're doing all this hard work to get the link. You don't want to send it out of your site to YouTube or Vimeo, you want to try your best to send it to your own site. It's not always going to work. Sometimes people would prefer linking to YouTube, but you want to give yourself a better shot of trying to get those links for your website.

So when you're engaging in your video marketing and your SEO, I'm not saying change your complete strategy, what I would say is there are some things that you need to tie up the loose ends, which is try to get that final step of linking to your website, not the video hosting platform.

But I'm going to go ahead and leave that at that, hopefully that will help you think about and execute your own link building strategy when it comes to videos. I think a lot of people forget this step, they just think, "Hey, it's my YouTube video, I'll get the equity." That's not how it really works. Make sure you understand that, your team understands that.

I'm going to go ahead and pour out my tea. If you guys found this video valuable and you liked it, please like and subscribe. I hope to see you guys again soon. Thanks everybody.

Is it worth letting someone else post on my Blog

Transcript

Hi guys, Welcome to another edition of Zupo's SEO Talk and Tea.

Today's conversation: is it worth letting someone else post a guest blog on your site? And what I specifically mean here is not your friends and not your peers. Specifically, if you get a cold email about adding a guest post to your site. I think everyone gets these emails and I want to discuss today if it's worth it or not, or when it is worth it.

But before we begin, I want to introduce the tea we have today. We have a Baked Goods Oolong tea. This tea is one that we have bought from the brand Mei Leaf. Mei Leaf is my favorite tea brand. I buy most of my tea from them and I spend a lot of my money on them, but I think it's totally worth it. I think they have some amazing teas and I'm always excited to get some new shipments.

And so this Baked Goods Oolong tea is called Baked Goods because the tasting notes are supposed to be similar to a lot of baked goods. And so I've had this in another video. I will say this tea tastes very sweet, once you have it with a saltier meal. By itself, I just don't think I have the palate yet, but I didn't notice much sweetness without a saltier kind of meal. But once I did have the saltier meal, man, it was a little sweet.

But let's go ahead and talk and start talking about SEO. So is it worth having someone guest post on your site, especially in the context of a cold email? I will say more often than not, no. A lot of my clients will forward me the emails that they get about, hey, we want to post on your website. Generally, I'm just a flat out, no. I don't think it's worth it most of the time, and second, a lot of these people don't understand our content. They're not going to really help this site.

But that's a short answer for no, but let's actually talk about and discover times where it might actually be worth it. There are two main areas where I think it might actually be worth it. One, if the person is willing to contribute content that really fits in our content library for a keyword we're trying to rank for. Hey, I don't see why not. They're going to do the work, what we can post it on our site. And so if you're like, for example, I have a site pizza.com and I'm trying to rank for breadsticks and I'm trying to fill out my content library for breadsticks. And someone says, "Hey, I have this cool recipe for a different style of breadsticks and I'd love to contribute to a blog post to your site." Hey, we need more breadsticks content anyways. Yeah. I don't see why not.

Second. That's one reason. But the second, the other reason, and this is the one we use more heavily. If the person reaching out to you is interested in guest posting, what I often like to do is check their own sites and see how strong their website is. If they have a strong SEO profile, we will then ask them if they're interested in a content partnership. So what I mean by that is, when you're link-building, it's often difficult to find opportunities to work with high domain authority and high quality SEO sites. And if a site is reaching out to us and we find that, hey, you know what? They actually have a strong SEO profile. They have a strong domain authority, domain rating, then we will actually say, "Hey, you know what? You can post on our site if you're willing and open to a partnership where we contribute content on behalf of each other."

And this can go beyond just a blog, if you want to do some social media stuff. I've even had a client say, "Hey, I'd even be interested in having a business partnership with them." So I would say there are times when it's worth it. You just need to do a little bit of homework of understanding how strong the person who's asking you, their website is. And if it's strong enough, maybe create that partnership or two, if their content they want to contribute is in line with the content that you're trying to grow, that might also be worth it as well.

So in some cases, it's not as obvious. More often than not, yes, it is going to... So, that's going to be confusing. More often than not, it is going to be, no, we're not going to allow anyone to guest post on our site, but a couple occasions where it may make sense. One, if it fits your content strategy. And second, if there is an opportunity for a strong SEO or business partnership with a site, because they have a strong SEO profile. Those are the cases where I would recommend clients, yes, there might be some [inaudible 00:03:50] to play here.

But I'm going to go ahead and leave it at that. If you guys enjoyed what you saw, please like and subscribe. I'm going to go ahead and start enjoying my tea now. And I'd love to see you guys again soon. Thanks everybody.

Is it worth Guest Posting on the Same Site More than Once

Transcript

Hi guys, and welcome to another edition of Zupo's SEO Talk & Tea. 

Today's conversation - is it worth guest posting on a site more than once? I think this is an important conversation because I think a lot of people think that they know the answer, but actually we're going to discover that question a little bit and kind of talk through to see what the different purposes maybe for when you do want to and when you don't want to. But before we begin, this is Zupo's SEO Talk & Tea, so we're going to be introducing the tea we had today, which is a Pu'Er Tea I drink pretty heavily. I probably drink this every day. Every so often I will switch it out, but generally I drink it every day. It's a fermented tea, that's very strong, very dark liquid when it's brewed, so it is something that I could relate to black coffee a lot, even though, I must say, it does not taste anything like black coffee. It's more of the darkness and the power of drinking it.

I want to say power. It should be kick that you get when you're drinking it. But also let's go ahead and begin and start talking about SEO things. So, is it worth guest posting on a site more than once? Now, let's start with the understanding of referring domains. In one of my other videos I have talked about how referring domains is a very strong indicator of the growing profile for your SEO profile when it comes to link equity. People will talk about adding links. I more so talk about adding referring domains because adding referring domains, with each subsequent, new referring domain you add to your site there's more link equity in that. Because in the sense that, if you get a link from one domain and then you get a second link by the same domain, the power equity of each link on the same domain gets progressively weaker.

But every new link from each referring domain doesn't really have that problem because Google... And the philosophy behind this is that it's much more difficult to get one new, additional link from each new domain rather than get three links from the same domain. So, in that sense you might say, "Okay, then it's not worth guest posting on a site more than once," because like we've talked about each subsequent link gets weaker and weaker from that domain. Well, I even used to believe that, but now my theory has changed in the sense that we have to think of things a little bit more granular and more micro. There are some occasions where you're probably trying to rank multiple pages of your site. You're not just trying to rank one page. So, in that sense you might have a service page here, a product page there, a blog post here that you're trying to rank for.

And when you're doing link building, remember you have to link build to a specific URL. So in that sense, when you are linked in to a specific URL, that's great that you might be able to acquire a link to this one blog post from that one domain. But that link is only going to that one blog post. So most of the link equity is being passed to that blog post that you've just linked to, and yes, through internal linking, you might be able to pass on link equity through your internal links. But if you've ever gone very micro with your SEO, and you're starting to compete with other companies with their landing pages versus your landing pages or your blog whispers their blog posts, what you'll often do is some research where you'll say, "Hey, their page gets this many links and this many referring domains."

Now the domain as a whole gets this, but we're specifically looking at the page itself. So, in that case, if we get very micro and let's use an example. I have a pizza shop, a website, and a pizza shop, and I want you to rank for my sausage, pepperoni pizza page. We have the landing pages of our sausage, pepperoni pizza. That's the page, and we see on the top first page of Google the average website that's referring from the first page has 10 referring domains going to their sausage, pepperoni pizza page. And that may be why we're not ranking because we only have two referring domains coming in. So in that case, I don't see any problem with going to the same sites you've already guest posted for and trying to write a piece that talks about sausage pepperoni pizza and link build to that exact section of your website, therefore drive more referring domains and backlinks.

You can go back to the same sites and guest post for them and use the links for the same page, for different pages. It all depends on your resources. If you have new libraries and new websites coming up that want you to guest post for them, then, yeah. Go for the new ones. But you can always go for the same sites that have very strong SEO profiles and guest post multiple times, and then link back to different blog posts every single time to help spread and target the link equity to the pages you want. And that's where I would say it is with guest posting on a site more than once, especially if it has a strong SEO profile and two, if you can pass the link equity and links to different blog posts and sections of your website, therefore you're not only getting one link to one page. You can start getting multiple links to multiple pages that will ultimately help your site in a more targeted micro fashion.

So, this con this conversation is a little bit more complex. If you have any questions, please feel free to comment or shoot us a question on our website. I'm going to go ahead and pour my tea out. It's so dark guys. If you saw it, it's so dark. I just have to comment on this. It looks exactly like black coffee. I'm going to pour my tea out. If you guys enjoyed the video, please like and subscribe, and I hope to see you guys again soon.

Thanks everybody.

Discovering keywords that your site may be Ranking for

Transcript

Hi guys, and welcome to another edition of Zupo SEO Talk & Tea.

Today's conversation is discovering keywords that your site may be ranking for that you're unaware of, or in other words, discovering keywords that your site ranks for. Now this may sound a little obvious. Of course I know what keywords my site ranks for I'm doing SEO, but what I'm kind of specifically talking about today is sometimes when you're doing SEO or actually not sometimes, most of the time you're doing SEO, you are mainly considering or focused on a small subset of keywords, the ones that you've defined with your keyword research strategy and so on and so forth, but a lot of sites will grow organically. And what you often find is that your sites are ranking for keywords that you were unaware of, and these might be great opportunities to pursue.

So that's what I want to talk about today. But before we begin, I want to introduce the tea we have today. The tea we have today is a Pu'Er Tea, this is probably the tea I drink the absolute most. I drink this probably maybe once, probably every day, it varies. Every day on the weekdays. That's the best way to put it. I drink this a lot. Pu'Er is a fermented tea. It's a very dark tea. That it would be the closest thing to black coffee if you want something with a strong kick, but let's go ahead and get talking and get brewing. So talking about discovering keywords your site ranks for. Like I said, in the beginning, when you're doing SEO, you often find that your site starts to rank new keywords that you didn't even try to rank for.

And this is commonly the case, you're writing a lot of the content, you're doing a lot of SEO. You're doing a lot of link building. Naturally, your site will start to rank for things that you're unaware of, but the most important thing is you need to discover these things. There are different tools out there, including [inaudible 00:01:43]. That will help monitor these things for you. They will monitor what keywords you're ranking for, and then you can also then kind of peruse them to see if there's any of interests. Now, generally, what I find is on we're looking at keywords at a site is ranking for 90% of the time, the keywords on there that we're trying to rank for have no business relevance to us in the sense that even though we're happy with a keyword, the keyword does not move us along the lines in terms of business bottom line, revenue, sales, it just doesn't really help that.

And if that's the case, I pretty much just ignore them, but there are two places that sometimes that 10% where I do look into it. One, you'll sometimes find that they are keywords that actually do help move the bottom line and you kind of like hit yourself on the head. Like, "Wow, we never even thought of that keyword, but we're ranking for it anyways. Let's double down on it." And in those cases, those are great because sometimes it's best to kind of go with the flow of how your site is growing organically. And if you find keywords that you're already starting to rank for, and second, they fit your bottom line, go ahead, double down. You're already started ranking for it a little bit, you should just put more energy into focusing on that, because Google has already recognized your site as somewhat playable in that space. Double down on that. Second, another angle to think about, and this is kind of where you're kind of leveraging everything you can from the assets you have.

If sometimes you're ranked for a keyword that doesn't necessarily help your business bottom line, nor does it really help your sales, but it is a popular search query and a lot of people are going there. If that's the case, you can use it for link building purposes. If you're ranked number one first page on Google for a term or a blog post that you don't necessarily care about ranking for, but you have it anyways, double down on that in the sense that use it as a link building opportunity. Maybe beef it up a little bit ads images, and then when you go out there, you could tell people, "Hey, we have a blog post ranked on the first page is a really ultimate guide. If you guys ever want to reference it, feel free to do so."

In that sense, you can then acquire some assets in the sense that that blog posts or those keywords that you're ranking for that don't help your bottom line can still help you in some way in terms of the link building or SEO. Now I will say this does require a lot of creativity. And second, it does also not always work in the sense. Sometimes you'll find some of the keywords you rank for on the first page really just don't make any sense. And that's okay, but what I would say is that you don't try to force it, but always... I generally do like a quarterly review of the sites I work with to see what keywords are starting to rank for, and then determine, hey, what are the ones that we could double down on? And then second, what are the ones that they don't really make much sense, but we could probably find some value out of it in other marketing areas.

And I think that would help you a lot because when you're doing marketing, I think sometimes we think of marketing as sitting in a conference room with a whiteboard or getting our creativity out there, but what I would say is sometimes the best marketing is reading the market and reading the organic growth. And if Google is raking you for keywords, even for keywords that you were not really focused on, it does give you a great opportunity to just grow there anyway. Who said we have to brainstorm and think about new keyword opportunities, you can always leverage the ones that you weren't considering, but you're already growing for. And that's a really great organic way of growing your work site in SEO. So hopefully that was valuable guys. I'm going to go ahead and pour my tea out. If you like what you saw, please like, and subscribe. And I'm going to enjoy my tea now. I hope to see you guys again soon.

Thanks everybody.

Can you Report a Website Involved in Negative

Transcript

Hi guys. And welcome to another edition of Zupo's SEO Talk & Tea. 

Today's conversation is can you report a site to Google Associates that's engaging in SEO or spammy kind of tactics or doing something against their guidelines? The reason why I want to talk about that today is often when we're doing comparative research or looking at our competition or competing sites, we'll find that our competitors are doing things that are pretty much against the guidelines of Google and it can frustrate us. And so we're going to talk about that today.

Before we begin, do you want to introduce the tea because this is Zupo's SEO Talk & Tea. We have a Keemun black tea from Tea Station. Tea Station is one of the OG Boba shops from back in the day. I think I bought this tea like six years ago, actually. So it's been a really long time. I like taking this out whenever, I just want to change things up a little bit. It kind of tastes like the base of a Boba mote tea, and this is what Boba mote tea is made out of, but let's go ahead and get brewing and get talking.

So, when it comes to reporting a site to Google, this often happens when you're analyzing competitors and you're seeing that they're doing a spammy SEO techniques or anything like that. And in my experience, I've worked in SEO for about 10 plus years and it's funny, I have found many sites for my clients who their competitors are engaging in harmful or negative SEO, but I've never actually engaged in reporting them because we've just focused on our client's site and doing good SEO.

But the other week I had a conversation with a client and we could tell one of our competitors was engaging in somewhat negative SEO and so I decided, hey, you know what? In conversation, let me go look that up, let me go see if that's even possible and did some research. And I looked through and yes, it is possible. There actually is a tool devoted and made by Google to report spammy websites. So in that case... I believe it's called a Google web spam report and it can be found through their Google Search Console. And so this is great in the sense that you can now actually go directly to Google and report them. Report them being sites that are engaging in negative spammy SEO.

What I have found, and I have the tool here, and I just want to read it to you guys so that you can guys can see. It is a Google Search Console, and there's different ways that you can report a site. The ones listed on the site are paid links, objectionable content, malware, other Google products, something else is wrong, copyright and other legal issues, personal private phishing, and rich snippets. Because this is an SEO channel, we're probably going to be mostly talking about paid links and phishing. Actually, no, probably just paid links.

Paid links is the main one that you're going to find or rich snippets actually. Paid links and rich snippets are the two that are most relevant to SEO and is something that you could probably be looking into to report. I will say that as I was doing my analysis of the report and everything, Google has said that they do not honor a majority of the lab reports they get. So what that means is that they get many reports every day of people trying to report on other websites, engaging in spammy SEO. They will focus and hedge their efforts on sites that are ranked on the first page of Google for different search queries. And then second, they will also just do their own manual review. And then they will determine if they're going to penalize that site.

Google said in their blog that they will, they generally only honor a small percentage of reports that come in. So please keep that in mind. And when you file the report, I have it pulled up here. Let me find it for you guys. You can report based on the different categories, prompts that they'll provide, say, okay, how do you know that they're doing this? And can you show examples and actual evidence? So in that case, that's kind of what you're going to have to do. You not only have to report the site, but you have to have evidence and a clear reason of why you believe that they should be reported.

So in that case, that does give you another tool in your arsenal of SEO tools, in the sense that if you are up against a site that is clearly just disregarding SEO rules, and they're really going against Google guidelines, you can use the Google web spam report to report your competitors. So I would say that, that might be a good tactic to use, but I would say not in isolation. Ensure that even if you're a competitor engaging in spammy SEO, that you are still hedging on proper SEO, which is high quality link building, digital PR, good content, growing the size of your site, and so on and so forth.

So while you go about your day, know that that tool exists. I encourage you to do some research. There's a lot of text and information that's going to be on there. So I encourage you to go look at it as well. But again, it's something that you can use in tandem with your SEO strategies, especially if some of your competitors are not playing by the rules. I'm going to go ahead and pour out my tea. If you guys found that video enjoyable or you liked what you saw, please like and subscribe and hope to see you guys again soon. Thanks everybody.

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